Motorcycle security

If someone is determined to steal your ride they will but there’s a lot you can do to put them off trying.

The security measures you can take can be passive or active. For active think big locks, while passive is tracking devices and security marking. The latter won’t stop your bike from being stolen, but if it is, it should be easier to get it back.

When it comes to choosing a lock there’s a bewildering choice but a couple of points to consider; is it Thatcham approved, and is it approved by your motorcycle insurer? The latter will likely get you a discount on your annual premium and the former means it has been put through the most rigorous testing around. In real world terms, this means the lock will withstand attack from power tools longer than a lock without approval. Those few minutes could make the difference between keeping your bike or losing it.

Motorcycle locks are generally one of two kinds; chains and D-locks or disc locks. The advantage of using a chain or D-lock is that you can secure the bike to an immovable object – think lamppost or ground anchor. The disadvantage is that a good lock and chain will be heavy, very heavy and carrying it around can be a trial. On the other hand, disc locks are small and relatively light. What a disc lock won’t stop though is someone loading your bike into a van and driving off with it. You’ll also need to be careful to remember to remove it each time you ride off; replacing a damaged brake disc is not cheap.

A tracker won’t stop a thief from taking your bike, but it should make it easier to get your bike back and it may help the police to catch the thief. By making use of GPS technology and smartphone connectivity, many tracking systems will allow you to monitor the location of your bike at all time. Many of them will also provide a text message or phone call alert if anything happens to your bike and then contact the authorities on your behalf to start the process of getting your bike recovered.

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