Vespa GTV 300 Sei Giorni

The Vespa name is synonymous with both modern and classic scooters and the special edition Sei Giorni enhances the company’s nostalgic ethos even further.“

Underneath the skin, the engine, chassis and other running gear are basically the same as you’d find in Vespa’s market-leading GTS 300 variations; so how did this unique-looking scooter evolve? It’s time for a quick history lesson.

The 1951 International Six Day Trial (ISDT)

The 26th edition of the ISDT took place between September 18 and 23, 1951, in Varese, Northern Italy. The competition mixed off-road and on-road routes with a track session held at the Monza race circuit. The ‘Piaggio Squadra Corse’ (as the team was named) entered the event on a specially-prepared Vespa 125 and won nine individual gold medals. They also earned Piaggio the ‘Industry Gold Medal’, as the only Italian team to win the trial.

As a result of this success, Piaggio produced a limited edition of around 300 units; these were destined to be used in various regularity competitions and were sold for four times the price of a standard Vespa 125.

 

The 2018 version

Drawing its inspiration from that event, the Sei Giorni (Italian for Six Day) is based on the Vespa GTV 300 with its distinctive ‘fenderlight’ (headlamp on mudguard) styling, but with the addition of matt green paintwork with ‘No.6’ graphics on the legshields and panels, bare chrome handlebars, a smoke-effect flyscreen, five-spoke black wheel rims with red graphics, a ribbed ‘alcantara’ effect single sports seat and a black-painted exhaust heatshield. Piaggio also says there will only be 150 units of this limited edition officially imported into the UK, and in line with other Vespa special edition models, the scooter has its identity and individual serial number shown on a metal plate attached to the legshields.

While the scooter retains Vespa’s vintage looks and sports heritage, everything else about it is modern and up-to-date with front and rear disc brakes and state-of-the-art electronics which includes both ABS and ASR systems. Vespa claims 83 miles per gallon for the scooter, which I would guess as being reasonably accurate, as it’s what I’d normally get out of my GTS 300 version. With a tank capacity of 8.5 litres (1.87 gallons) that should give you a maximum range of 155 miles.

The main instrument panel is in a central cluster at the top of the steering column and provides all the basic information needed; you get the obligatory array of warning lights, a digital clock and fuel gauge, plus an odometer/speedometer setup with the kph speed indicator marked out in large figures on the outside, with the inner mph figures being smaller (personally I’d have liked to have seen that setup the other way around, but that’s the Italian styling showing through).

 

On the road

Vespa scooters have always had a reputation for quality styling, handling and performance; so how does this translate across to the Sei Giorni?

Well, to someone who’s more used to a traditional scooter layout, the motorcycle-styled handlebars might seem a little out of place initially; and with the front headlight being down on the mudguard rather than on top of the headset, riding it for the first time might feel a little strange (like there’s something missing at the front end). But that said, after a short distance, you’ll soon adapt to the scooter’s handling, which is not dissimilar to other sibling scooters in the range.

It grips the road and corners well on its 12in wheels with the suspension soaking-up unwanted road surface imperfections and it all works well in conjunction with the ASR traction control system. Another thing that works well is the ABS braking system which provides just enough stopping power whether you’re riding under normal road conditions, or in an emergency stop situation.

Something that is really comfortable is that ribbed seat; however, the downside is that it’s designed as a single seater, so the compromise is that you can’t carry a passenger (well, you probably could – but they probably wouldn’t thank you for it afterwards).

 

Styling and practicality

There’s no doubting that the Sei Giorni has some very distinctive styling features, but do they come at the cost of practicality? That miniscule smoked flyscreen may like cool, but does it really serve any purpose, other than looking good? There’s many a scooterist out there who will avidly argue that a small screen increases the wind pressure on the upper torso, whereas as full size screen will deflect that wind pressure up and over. And does having a front headlight so close to the ground really give you the same forward tunnel of light that a headlamp on top of the headset provides? Piaggio says it does, but I still need to be convinced on that one.

As well as an inner legshield storage area (which also houses a USB connection), the scooter has a reasonable size underseat compartment which Piaggio says will take a jet style helmet with a little room to spare for other nick-nacks; Okay, it’s not the biggest storage space in the world, but this does help to make the Sei Giorni a much more viable option for the commuter.

 

Summing-up

What you get with the Sei Giorni is a well-built, stylish, retro-looking scooter that has enough power to hold its own at motorway speeds, but is still tractable enough to serve as an everyday commuter machine. Would I buy one? Well, if I was in the market for an A2 licence bike that is versatile enough to serve either as a commuter, or a long distance machine, then it would certainly be on my shortlist.

 

SPECIFICATION

Vespa GTV Sei Giorni 300

ENGINE: Quasar 278cc 4-stroke single cylinder

POWER: 21.5hp at 7500 rpm

FUEL SYSTEM: port Injected

COOLING SYSTEM: Liquid

TRANSMISSION: CVT with torque server

FRONT SUSPENSION: single link arm with hydraulic shock absorber

REAR SUSPENSION: coil spring with adjustable hydraulic shock absorber

BRAKES: hydraulically operated 220mm disc front and rear

TYRES: 12″ tubeless, 120/70 (F), 130/70 (R)

SEAT HEIGHT: 790mm

RUNNING WEIGHT: 158kg

FUEL TANK CAPACITY: 8.5 litres

WARRANTY: 2yrs unlimited mileage, parts and labour

RRP: £5499

CONTACT: www.vespa.com

O2W Rating: 8 Stars

A2

LICENCE

SPECIFICATION

Vespa GTV Sei Giorni 300

ENGINE: Quasar 278cc 4-stroke single cylinder

POWER: 21.5hp at 7500rpm

FUEL SYSTEM: Port injected

COOLING SYSTEM: Liquid

TRANSMISSION: CVT with torque server

FRONT SUSPENSION: Single link arm with hydraulic shock absorber

REAR SUSPENSION: Coil spring with adjustable hydraulic shock absorber

BRAKES: Hydraulically operated 220mm disc front and rear

TYRES: 12in tubeless, 120/70 (F), 130/70 (R)

SEAT HEIGHT: 790mm

RUNNING WEIGHT: 158kg

FUEL TANK CAPACITY: 8.5 litres

Comments

comments